Guide to the Stone Rows of Dartmoor

The Dancers Cairn Circle and Stall Moor (Upper Erme) Stone Row

Photo: The Dancers Cairn Circle and Stall Moor (Upper Erme) Stone Row

Perhaps the most distinctive and enigmatic of the prehistoric monuments on Dartmoor are the stone rows. Dartmoor has the largest concentrations of stone rows of any area in Britain. There are over seventy stone rows known on Dartmoor today (see listing below) although there were probably once considerably more. A small number of the rows recorded by antiquarians in the nineteenth century have disappeared either through destruction at the hands of road and newtake wall builders whilst others may have simply receded into the peat1.

The stone rows consist of one or more roughly straight lines of standing stones many of which include structures such as cairn circles or large standing stones at either or both ends. The rows consist of a wide variety of size stones and a wide variety of lengths.

The single rows are typically 40 to 200 m in length2 although there are four rows on the southern moor which are over 0.5 km in length (Burford Down, Stall Moor (Upper Erme), Stalldown and Butterdon Hill). Curiously these four rows are all very roughly north-south in orientation. The longest is the Stall Moor stone row which stretches for 3.1 km from The Dancers (Upper Erme) cairn circle over rough terrain with stones going up and down gullies all the way to a cairn on Green Hill.

There are many double and a few triple stone rows on Dartmoor. These rows are typically between 100m and 200m in length. Particularly fine examples of double rows include Merrivale, Hurston Ridge and the Assycombe stone rows. The Cosdon and Challacombe rows are the most impressive of the triple stone rows. At Corringdon Ball there is an odd complex variously described as a seven-fold stone row or a combination of two triple stone rows consisting of very small stones.

The double stone rows have often been referred to as stone avenues suggesting that they may have had some kind of ritual processional purpose. However whilst some have an average spacing of around 3.0m between the rows many have spacing less than 0.5m, some as narrow as 0.2m which is too narrow for a ritual pathway. The spacing of the stones within a row is very irregular as is the spacing in-between rows3. A good example is the Assycombe double stone row which has a distance between the rows that fluctuates wildly between 1.0m and 1.6m.

Hurston Ridge Stone Row

Hurston Ridge Stone Row

The stones of the rows vary in size with the majority consisting of stones less than 1m high for most of their length. Many of the rows consist of very small stones but often there will be a large terminal standing stone. The most impressive of these are the Drizzlecombe stone rows one of which has a terminal standing stone 4.2m high. Other notable examples include the Langstone Moor stone row, the Laughter Tor double stone row and the Shovel Down Longstone stone row. According to an account by Wilkinson in 1859 the Hart Tor double stone row was “terminated by a large monolith, now fallen, measuring about 25 feet long by 2 feet and 3 inches”, sadly this massive stone has long disappeared. A small number of the double rows have transverse blocking stones at the lower end, a good example being the Hurston Ridge row.

Cairns are also commonly associated as terminal features of the stone rows typically at the upper end. Fine examples include the Down Tor, Trowlesworthy East, Hart Tor and Ringmoor stone rows. In the case of single rows there is often a cairn at one end followed by a row of small stones ended by a large terminal stone a good example being the Drizzlecombe stone rows. Some of the rows have cairns and cists alongside them and in the case of one of the Merrivale double rows there is a large cairn actually within the row about midway along its length. A few of the rows form part of a ceremonial complex with other associated monuments such as stone circles, cists, cairns and standing stones such as at Merrivale, Fernworthy, Shovel Down and Drizzlecombe.

Staldon Stone Row
Perhaps the most impressive stone row still standing is the megalithic in proportion Stalldown stone row (see photo). This consists of massive blocks with mostly 1m to 1.5m high with four over 2m. The fallen stones of the Piles Hill stone row suggest it would have been even more striking with over 30 stones being between 2m and 3m in length. In 2004 a new stone row was discovered on Cut Hill which consists of massive fallen slabs over 2m in length. The Cut Hill row is the only row to have solid dating evidence, carbon dating of the peat surrounding the recumbent stones suggests a date “around the second half of the fourth millennium BC”.4 It is thought that most of the cairn circles and cists date to the early Bronze Age which would suggest a similar date for most of the stone rows but clearly the Cut Hill example is earlier dating back into the Neolithic. This suggests that the stone rows may have been constructed over a prolonged period of time through the late Neolithic and the early Bronze Age. It could be that the more megalithic in proportion rows are earlier but without firm evidence this is mere speculation. The association of many rows with cairns suggests that most of the stone rows are related to burial customs although care is needed when generalising to all stone rows as they are so varied in form. Also Emmett suggests it could be possible that these monuments could have had multiple phases of construction with cairns added later. To understand the stone rows better it is necessary to consider the environment at the time of construction.

Dartmoor Stone Rows in Context

The first thing that should be considered is the environment in which these structures were erected. Today it is largely open moorland but in the Mesolithic these upland areas were largely forested. The first farmers started to change the environment and a process of deforestation started to take place. Initially Mesolithic clearances would have started to cause forest recession on higher ground. Later there would have been clearings on lower land with otherwise continuous forest. Much of Dartmoor would have been forested at the time these monuments started to be erected.

Until recently the only stone row on Dartmoor to undergo a detailed archaeological dig was the Cholwich Town stone row which was excavated in 1961 prior to being buried underneath waste from the china clay works. The pollen evidence suggested it was constructed in a clearing of grassland or heath land within a forest of alder, oak and hazel.

The Cholwich Town example suggests that many of the stone rows would not have been constructed on open moorland as we see it today, instead they were constructed on the forest margins when the valley slopes and bottoms were still forested. The altitude and location of the stone rows, around the altitude of the then forest margins, is similar to those of the cairn circles but notably different to the location of the hut circles which came later largely on lower ground in the valleys. Emmett suggests that the clear implication “is that the rows are earlier than the ubiquitous, valley sited, later Bronze Age settlements, and roughly contemporary with the elusive earlier Bronze Age settlements, at a time when Dartmoor was still largely forested”.4 The recent dating of the Cut Hill stone row fits this general picture of the rows belonging to a period before the later Bronze Age settlement remains that can be seen today. In fact in this particular case the row, which is at a higher altitude than any other, is much earlier than previously thought for rows dating as it does to much earlier in the Neolithic.

There was a major study of 71 Dartmoor stone rows carried out by Emmett in 1979 (Stone rows: the traditional view reconsidered, D.A.S.P. No. 37 pp. 94-114). The orientation of the rows was largely random depending on the slopes they were sited on as the rows tend to gently ascend slopes. There was a very slight bias in the data to alignments in the NE quadrant but Emmett suggested this merely reflected a preponderance of rows in southern and eastern Dartmoor (there are very few in north-west Dartmoor). Giving a precise orientation was also impossible because many of them are not straight with bends and curves along the length. According to Butler a closer inspection of row orientation does also bring out a possible tendency towards orientation towards the cardinal points for some of the rows5.

The vast bulk of the rows have cairns at one end or sometimes at both ends. Emmett pointed out that it was impossible to say without excavations whether or not the cairns and the rows at each site were constructed at the same time. However, it seems likely that they were, which would suggest they are burial monuments. Claims for astronomical or solstice alignments for the vast majority of rows does not fit with their orientations and rough construction. The spacing of the stones within a row is very variable and for double and treble rows the spacing between the rows is very variable and the rows are generally “wriggly” with random kinks and curves along their length. According to Emmett:

“The obvious conclusion is that the exact stone position was irrelevant ... The general random nature of stone placing throughout, leads to the conclusion that rows were not precisely designed monuments, but structures built for an overall impression”.
Down Tor Stone Row

Down Tor Cairn Cirlce and Stone Row

There has long been speculation that Dartmoor stone rows have an astronomical purpose. The evidence for most of the rows does not support such a theory. The astronomer Lockyer made claims in 1906 that Merrivale and a number of other sites had astronomical purposes. R.H. Worth was rather scathing about such suggestions. In the case of Trowlesworthy, which Lockyer claimed pointed to Arcturus in 2100 BC, Worth simply pointed out that one end of the row was not visible from the other as it went over a hill - so it could not possibly be used for such a purpose6. Jack Walker's book Dartmoor Sun has beautiful pictures of the stones of the Down Tor stone row at the summer and winter solstices casting their shadows along the line of the row7. It is of course not impossible that this is by design but a simpler explanation is that with over 70 stone rows with widely variant orientations it is not surprising that one may have by chance the right orientation for this to happen. There is no credibility to claims that Dartmoor stone rows have an astronomical purpose.

In contrast to the stone rows the cists do have a very obvious alignment as first noted by Worth8. About 94% of them have the long axis within the NW/SE quadrants skewed by about 5 degrees on average. It would appear that some rough orientation towards the sun was a factor in the orientation of cists. According to Butler this pattern is not repeated on Bodmin Moor where the orientation of cists “is too variable to be significant”. Clearly burial customs and monument construction had a local character in the prehistoric. It is interesting to note that there are very few stone rows on Exmoor in North Devon instead there are curious arrangements of very small stones in rectangular structures known as stone settings. There are a small number of stone rows elsewhere in North Devon and some on Bodmin Moor but they appear to be quite different to the Dartmoor rows. The greatest concentration of stone rows in the British Isles outside of Dartmoor are to be found on the upland fringes in counties Derry, Fermanagh and Tyrone in Northern Ireland. There are also sites consisting of very small stones known as stone fans in NE Scotland which apparently have similarities with the Corringdon Ball stone rows.

The Exploration and Restoration of Dartmoor Stone Rows

One of the earliest accounts of a “stone avenue” on Dartmoor appears in Richard Polwhele's 1793 book Historical Views of Devonshire. This was actually written by Rev. John Swete and is a description of a supposed “druid way” near Spinsters Rock. Whilst there are still some “conical pillars” near Spinsters Rock these remains may no longer exist although a dig on Shilstone Common by Tyler in 1930 probably rediscovered cairn circles associated with these old reports. Polwhele in his descriptions of monuments in Devon, and his contemporary Borlase in his writings on Cornwall, attributed monuments and natural features such as rock basins as being the temples and places of worship of the Druids. This tradition of association of prehistoric monuments to the Druids was continued by Samuel Rowe in his classic 1848 work A Perambulation of Dartmoor. This was based on an earlier article Antiquarian Investigations in the Forest of Dartmoor, Devon published in 1830 in the Transactions of the Plymouth Institute. He introduces his paper by saying that the remoteness of Dartmoor has prevented the destruction of ancient remains but they are at risk, he stated:

“In these districts, therefore, the antiquary naturally looks for the vestiges of this people and their times; and as many of the most interesting relics are in hourly danger of spoliation, the notices in the following paper have been collected and published, with the hope that some may escape impending destruction, and that others may be preserved from that oblivion which appears to endanger the very memory of their existence”.9

These sentiments were reflected later in the concerns of the Dartmoor Preservation Society and the activities of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee. In the early nineteenth century stones from monuments were being plundered by road builders and there was an active campaign to make land productive for agriculture and as a consequence stones were being utilised for new buildings and new-take walls. This was also a period of industrial development on Dartmoor with leats, tramways associated with mining and railways starting to be built.

Rowe's 1830 article was one of the first to give descriptions of stone rows on Dartmoor. He gives accounts of Merrivale, Black Tor (Hart Tor), Challacombe, Watern Hill (Hurston Ridge - later claimed as being discovered by George French and the Dartmoor Exploration Committee) and the Shovel Down stone rows. A Perambulation of Dartmoor was majorly revised in a third edition in 1895 by Rowe's nephew J. Brooking Rowe although he rejected the Druid views of Samuel Rowe. R. N. Worth felt it necessary in 1880 to put the issue to rest by penning the rather scathing article Were There Druids in Devon? which pointed out that the theories of Polwhele and Borlase had no basis in fact.10

From the mid-nineteenth century there was a flourishing of interest in Dartmoor antiquities. Authors such as Ormerod revisited earlier accounts and made new observations. The Egyptologist Gardener Wilkinson wrote a major article on British Remains on Dartmoor in 1862. Spence Bate carried out an excavation of the terminal cairn of the Penn Beacon row and W. C. Lukis made plans of many sites on Dartmoor in 1879. In 1892 Richard Nichols Worth, father of Richard Hansford Worth, started the first in a series of five articles in the Transactions of the Devonshire Association on The Stone Rows of Dartmoor11. The first of these documented the 27 known stone rows at the time but the pace of discovery of new rows was illustrated by the inclusion of a last minute footnote from Robert Burnard about the discovery of the Assycombe stone row. This was the golden age of exploration and each annual report included descriptions of newly discovered stone rows. After R. N. Worth's death his son R. H. Worth continued the reports until 1911 and a total of 62 stone rows were listed in his collated writings on the subject in Worth's Dartmoor first published in 1953. To this day new stone rows are still periodically discovered such as the Cut Hill row in 2004 and the Tottiford row in 2009.

A number of the stone rows were restored by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee (notably by Sabine Baring-Gould, Robert Burnard and R. H. Worth). There has been much criticism of these restorations. There are many accounts in the reports to the Devonshire Association which give a sense of why it was considered so important to intervene to protect the sites. For example the report of the restoration of the Cosdon Row makes it clear that the Dartmoor Exploration committee were deeply concerned that failure to intervene would lead to the potential destruction of the site, see Extract from the Third Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee. R.H. Worth was very critical of some of the restorations, notably at Ringmoor Down and on the summit of Lakehead Hill due to a lack of accuracy in the restorations, but he was himself actively involved in the restorations as an act of preservation from further despoliation. Whatever criticisms we may have of the restorations we should be grateful that the process of destruction of sites was largely ended by the efforts of the restorers.

The following is a list of some of the more significant excavations and restorations of Dartmoor stone rows or associated cairns and menhirs:

Bibliography & references


1Butler points out that a number of monuments have disappeared under the peat and that this is likely to happen soon to the remaining sections of the Holne Moor triple row and the east end of the Cosdon rows. Butler (1997) p. 18.
2 Emmett (1979)
3 Emmett (1979)
4 Fyfe, Ralph M. & Greeves, Tom (2010)
5 Butler (1997) pp.239-243
6 Stone Rows and Astronomical Theory reproduced as Appendix IV in Worth (1971) pp.452-457
7 Walker (2005)
8 Worth R. H. (1971) pp.176-180
9 Rowe (1830) p.180
10 Were There Druids in Devon? T.D.A. Vol. 12, Worth R.N. (1880)
11 For a full listing of The Stone Rows of Dartmoor articles in the T.D.A and the reports of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee, see the listing of : Articles
12 An account of this is reproduced in Mrs Bray's The Borders of the Tamar and the Tavy, vol.1, (1844)
13 Bate (1872)
14 See Twelfth Report of the Barrow Committee (1890) and Transactions of the Plymouth Institute Vol. X 1889-1990 , and The Stone Rows of Dartmoor - Part 1, T.D.A. Vol. 24. The restoration of the menhirs is described in The Stone Rows of Dartmoor - Part 2, T.D.A. Vol. 25 (1893).
15 See Second Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee T.D.A. Vol. 27, (1895)
16 See Second Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee T.D.A. Vol. 27, (1895)
17 Worth R. H. (1971) p.226
18 See Twenty-Second Report of the Barrow Committee T.D.A Vol. 35 (1903)
19 Baring-Gould's field notes clearly refer to the blocking stone down hill being prone, see The Stone Rows of Dartmoor - Part 1 T.D.A. Vol. 24 p.389 (1892). Butler states the terminal stone at the other end was also restored, see Butler Vol. 2 p.166 (1991)
20 See The Stone Rows of Dartmoor - Part 3, T.D.A. Vol. 26 (1894)
21 See The Stone Rows of Dartmoor - Part 3, T.D.A. Vol. 26 (1894) and for a detailed account of the restoration see Burnard's Dartmoor Pictorial Records (originally published in 1894) pp. 68-70
22 See Third Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee, T.D.A. Vol. 28 (1896)
23 Worth R. H. (1971) pp.229-230
24Hemery (1983) p483
25 See Extract from the Third report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee, T.D.A. Vol. 28 (1896)
26 See Fourth Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee, T.D.A. Vol. 29 (1897)
27 Worth R. H. (1971) pp.206-7
28 The date of this restoration is typically referred to as being 1909 but may have been a subsequent summer. The Twenty-ninth Report of the Barrow Committee, T.D.A. Vol. 42 (1910) states that Brisworthy stone circle had been restored but the work on the row is not mentioned although it is stated that it had been included on the OS map. Breton (1911) refers to restoring the Brisworthy stone circle alongside R.H. Worth in the summer of 1909 and then later in reference to Ringmoor writes "we hope all these remains will be restored during the coming summer".
29 Worth R. H. (1971) pp.209, the original plan before restoration can be seen in T.D.A. Vol 73 p.234
30 Butler Vol 3 (1994) pp.142-3
31 See Katy Armstrong's thesis Archaeological geophysical prospection in peatland environments (2010) pp.206-241. See also, Armstrong, K, 2009b. Archaeological excavations at Yellowmead Stone Circles, Dartmoor Matters, The Dartmoor Preservation Association, Spring 2009, pp.10-11 and Armstrong, K, 2009c. Yellowmead stone circles, Sheepstor, Dartmoor Magazine. 94, pp.35-6.

Baring-Gould, S, A Book of Dartmoor, (1900), (Halgrove reprint 2002)
Bate, C Spence, Researches into Some Antient Tumuli on Dartmoor, T.D.A. Vol. 5 pp.549-58 (1872)
Bray, Anna Eliza, The Borders of the Tamar and the Tavy, vol.1, (1844)
Breton, Henry Hugh, Beautiful Dartmoor And Its Interesting Antiquities, (1911, republished in 1990)
Burnard, Robert, Dartmoor Pictorial Records, (1986)
Butler, Jeremy, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, vol.2: The North, (1991)
Butler, Jeremy, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, vol.3: The South-West, (1994)
Butler, Jeremy Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities: Vol. 5. - The Second Millennium B.C. (Devon Books, 1997)
Emmett, D.D. Stone rows: the traditional view reconsidered, D.A.S.P. No. 37 pp. 94-114 (1979)
Fyfe, Ralph M. & Greeves, Tom The date and context of a stone row: Cut Hill, Dartmoor, south-west England Antiquity Vol 84, No. 323 pp55-70. (2010). The article can be read on line here: The date and context of a stone row: Cut Hill, Dartmoor, south-west England
Lukis, W.C, Report on the Prehistoric Monuments of Devon and Cornwall and Report on the Monuments of Dartmoor, Proceeding of the Society of Antiquaries Vol. 8 (1881)
Newman, Phil The Field Archaeology of Dartmoor (English Heritage, 2011)
Hemery, Eric. High Dartmoor (Robert Hale, 1983)
Rowe, Samuel, Antiquarian Investigations in the Forest of Dartmoor, Devon, Transactions of the Plymouth Institute Vol. 1, pp.179- 212 (1830)
Rowe, Samuel, A Perambulation of Dartmoor (3rd Edition), (1896)
Walker, Jack, Dartmoor Sun, (2005)
Wilkinson J. Gardner, British Remains on Dartmoor, Journal Brit. Arch. Assoc. xviii. pp.22-53, 111-133. (1862)
Worth, R.H. Worth's Dartmoor (David & Charles, 1971)
Worth, R. N., The Stone Rows of Dartmoor - Parts 1-5 (1880)
Worth, R. N., Were There Druids in Devon?, Transactions of the Devonshire Association Vol. 12, pp.228- 242 (1880)

Database Listing of the Stone Rows of Dartmoor

Introduction

There are 76 stone rows listed by Butler ( Vol. 5 pp.213-14) and with one exception (see note on Shoveldown) they are all listed below with links to their location on the OS map, to their National Monument Records (NMR) and to any coverage on this website. Please note that external links open in a new page. Some of these rows were reliably reported in the past but on the National Monument Record are described as no longer in existence or otherwise untraceable (e.g. destroyed by quarrying or sunken in the peat or in the case of the Soussons Down Triple Stone row destroyed by plunder and afforestation). Worth listed 62 stones rows as republished in Worth's Dartmoor. This listing was increased to 71 rows by Emmett in his 1979 study although Emmett mentions "42 sites, some with rows of doubtful authenticity which are excluded". Since Butler's list a stone row on Cut Hill has been discovered. The Time Team dig at Tottiford Reservoir discovered two more stone rows which are included once in the listings. These 2 additional inclusions, less one Shoveldown row, brings the total of rows to 77.

Doubtful rows

There are numerous alignments of stones in existence today or reported to have once existed which have been described as stone rows or as possible stone rows. It is likely that many of these are in fact remains of reaves or walls or other structures from the historic period and some are just geological features. Some of these are discussed by Butler (Vol. 5 pp 214-19). Emmett refers to 42 sites of "doubtful authenticity" which he excluded from his study.

Prehistoric Monuments of Dartmoor list of Stone Rows

Academics and researchers will find the very comprehensive listing of 117 sites on Bill Radcliffe's Prehistoric Monuments of Dartmoor (PMD) website very useful. Each entry has a link to any related NMR and HER (Historical Environment Record) records along with useful bibliography and other details. The listing has a useful interface which gives listings by OS grid squares. It covers doubtful rows and those rows once reported by early explorers but now lost, destroyed, or otherwise untraceable.

The listing below covers most of the confirmed stone rows that can be seen today although it should be emphasised that some are insignificant and potentially very difficult to find!

Each record has a link to corresponding NMR, HER (the Heritage Gateway Historic Environment Record) and PMD records, a link to the location on the Ordnance Survey map, a photo (if available) and a link to relevant coverage on Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks and a link giving a listing of nearby sites. The author would like to thank Bill Radcliffe for the helpful correspondence whilst checking records. See also: Database and Web Search Tools

Note on nomenclature

The naming and numbering systems for stone rows used by different authors and authorities are not consistent. The listings by Worth are perhaps best well known so aspects of Worth's nomenclature will be used in these listings. Where there are 2 or more rows in the same location they maybe referred to using letters A,B,C ...or by numbers 1,2,3 ... where possible we use compass bearings as there can be no ambiguity with these e.g. N, E or S.E etc sometimes combined with Worth's lettering.

Note on Shoveldown

Different sources report different numbers of stone rows on Shovel Down. These vary from 5 to 10 rows. Worth describes 3 double rows (NMR Rows A,B,C) and one single row with an additional double row south of the Longstone. He speculates on whether the double row heading south from the Longstone to the Three Boys might be a continuation of the double row to the north of the Longstone with the Longstone in the middle. Butler treats these as two separate rows. The most recent update to the NMR record suggests that they are one and the same row (NMR Row E-F). The NMR records also mention accounts which suggest a total of up to 10 rows but later accounts suggest that there is one long single row broken into several sections (NMR Row D-G-H-F) which give the appearance of separate rows. This leaves a total of 4 double rows and one single row. Unfortunately, the NMR, Butler and Worth all use different systems for labelling the Shoveldown rows. Worth confusingly uses two letters per double row so there is a row A (presumably A & B) then a row C (C & D) etc. We will adopt the labelling used in the NMRs.

A table of these rows without photos and additional notes is available: Table of Dartmoor Stone Rows

Default listing is by Worth number. Click here to order instead by: Site Name, OS, Worth Number

Stall Moor (Upper Erme) Stone Row

Stall Moor (Upper Erme) Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Upper Erme Stone Row & Cairn Circle
OS Map: SX63516444
NMR record: SX 66 NW 20
HER record: 4309
Megalithic Portal: 1464
The Stone Rows of GB: Upper Erme
PMD: Stall Moor Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Stall Moor
DPD: 71
Notes: Worth: Stall Moor. Butler: Upper Erme. The longest stone row on Dartmoor. "A single stone row running for approximately 3.1km from a cairn on Green Hill to a stone circle on Stall Moor". Lethbridge pp.71-72, diagram p.71
Nearby sites: SX63516444

Butterdon Hill Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: The stone rows of Butterdon Hill, Piles Hill & Glasscombe
OS Map: SX65635880
NMR record: SX 65 NE 17
HER record: 2988
Megalithic Portal: 556
The Stone Rows of GB: Butterdon Hill
PMD: Butterdon Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Butterdon
DPD: 77
Notes: "The northern part of the Butterdon stone row has been surveyed from Hangershell Rocks cairn at SX 65645941 to Hobajons Cross at SX 65506045." and "For the 1050m of this part the majority of the several hundred stones are from 0.1m to 0.4m high and form an irregular line. There is a gap of 70.0m on the north side of Hangershell but otherwise the row is fairly continuous. The area is not entirely free of natural surface stones and while some can be immediately discounted occasionally there is a short double or triple row where all the stones are alike and these which formed the original row cannot now be determined. Barely two dozen stones are 0.5m high or higher, Hobajons Cross at 1.2m being the highest. It is possible that this was at some stage a terminal stone since it appears to have cup marks on the south face and the extension onwards, to the Longstone, is on an entirely different alignment." Lethbridge Row 1 diagram p.77.
Nearby sites: SX65635880

Burford Down Stone Row

Burford Down Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Burford Down stone row and cairns
OS Map: SX63706017
NMR record: SX 66 SW 57
HER record: 4333
Megalithic Portal: 1463
The Stone Rows of GB: Burford Down
PMD: Burford Down Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Burford Dn
DPD: 70
Notes: "This single stone row on a slight north slope extends from a crest at 260m OD to a col at 255m OD. It can be traced from its south terminal, marked by a cairn, at SX 63706017 for 336m, bearing 1o, to a possible blocking stone at SX 63706051 and of different character for a further 120m to SX63706062. The recumbent stone, considered ... to be the north terminal lies yet a further 47m distant at SX 63706067." See also: Sea Views at Burford Down
Nearby sites: SX63706017

Brown Heath (Hook Lake) Stone Row

Brown Heath (Hook Lake) Stone Row

OS Map: SX64106531
NMR record: SX 66 NW 48
HER record: 5136
Megalithic Portal: 1788
The Stone Rows of GB: Hook Lake
PMD: Brown Heath Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Hook Lake
DPD: 74
Notes: Worth: Brown Heath, Butler: Hook Lake. "On the southwest slopes of Brown Heath a double stone row 182.0m. long runs from a cairn circle at its northern and higher end to the east side of the enclosure (SX 66 NW 50) where it is overlaid by the enclosure wall. The point at which the southern end of the row ended is therefore not easily determined. The row does not point exactly to the centre of the cairn, but to about 2.0m. to the East. The eastern part of the row contains more stones than the western part, in which there are notable gaps. There are a few large stones, the largest being 1.0m. high and measuring 1.0m. x 0.7m., but most are relatively small, their average height being 0.5m". Lethbridge p.74, diagram p.71. See also: Sea Views at Hook Lake/
Nearby sites: SX64106531

Spurrell's Cross Stone Row

Spurrell's Cross Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: The stone rows of Butterdon Hill, Piles Hill & Glasscombe
OS Map: SX65855997
NMR record: SX 65 NE 16
HER record: 2890
Megalithic Portal: 2137
The Stone Rows of GB: Spurrells Cross
PMD: Spurrells Cross Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Spurrells X
DPD: 78
Notes: "The row has apparently been double, but since only seven stones still stand, which together with six sunken stones form the fixed points now determinable, it is difficult to ascertain the original spacing. The lines were probably about 3 feet 6 inches apart and the spacing between the stones about 3 feet. The length of the row is 370 feet as measured from the centre of the cairn and the direction of length is N 20o W. The largest standing stone is 2 feet in height. The cairn, at the south end of the row is 50 feet in diameter with only two stones remaining of the retaining circle". Lethbridge p.78, diagram p.77 Row 3
Nearby sites: SX65855997

Glasscombe Ball N. Stone Row

Glasscombe Ball N. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: The stone rows of Butterdon Hill, Piles Hill & Glasscombe
OS Map: SX65786049
NMR record: SX 66 SE 59
HER record: 5659
Megalithic Portal: 1952
The Stone Rows of GB: Glasscombe Ball North
PMD: Glasscombe Ball Stone Row
Short Name: SR:GlassBall N
DPD: 78
Notes: "A single stone row on the northern verge of Glasscombe Ball lies a little west of north from the row near Spurrell's Cross (SX 65 NE 16) and about a third of a mile from it" ... "A stone row extending between two cairns. The north-east cairn is 0.6m high and is now elongated north-west to south-east to 6.0m. by 4.0m, and is turf-covered. The south-west cairn, 4.0m. in diameter and 0.8m. high is of close-packed stones and turf-covered." Lethbridge p.78, diagram p.77 Row 2
Nearby sites: SX65786049

Stalldown Stone Row

Stalldown Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Stalldown Stone Row
OS Map: SX63226206
NMR record: SX 66 SW 17
HER record: 4277
Megalithic Portal: 531
The Stone Rows of GB: Stalldown
PMD: Staldon Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Stalldown
DPD: 67
Notes: "Bronze Age stone row and cairn circle on stall down. The stone row runs north -south for about 850m ow which 500m has been restored. It is associated with three cairns (one either side) and a cairn circle. The stones are mostly 1m to 1.5m high with four over 2m". Lethbridge pp.67-68
Nearby sites: SX63226206

Penn Beacon S. Stone Row

OS Map: SX59916255
NMR record: SX 56 SE 65
HER record: 2400
Megalithic Portal: 2076
The Stone Rows of GB: Penn Beacon South
PMD: Penn Beacon Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Penn Beac S
DPD: 62
Notes: "A single stone row, sixty-six feet long, the largest stone being about 2 1/2 feet high. This row is no more than a remnant". Lethbridge p.62 Penn stone row - diagram p.59.
Nearby sites: SX59916255

Penn Beacon S.W. Stone Row

OS Map: SX59526247
NMR record: SX 56 SE 62
HER record: 2399
Megalithic Portal: 2077
The Stone Rows of GB: Penn Beacon South West
PMD: Penn Beacon Cairn Stone Row
Short Name: SR:PennBeac SW
DPD: 61
Notes: "A short double stone row 24ft. long and nearly 2ft. wide consisting of two pairs of stones on the southern slope of Penn Beacon. To the north end of the row there is a cairn approximately 52 feet in diameter and 6 foot high. It was excavated in 1872, a cist was discovered, though the Capstan stone had collapsed at one end. Fragments of a wide mouthed jar were found and a slate implement, thought to be used for fashioning clay vessels". Lethbridge p.61 Penn Moor south double stone row and cairn - diagram p.59.
Nearby sites: SX59526247

Cholwich Town Stone Row

OS Map: SX58456224
NMR record: SX 56 SE 33
HER record: 2438
Megalithic Portal: 1824
The Stone Rows of GB: Cholwichtown
PMD: Cholwich Town Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Cholwich
Notes: "This ring and stone row is now covered by china clay waste. A stone row and circle on top of a low ridge, between Tory Brook and a tributary of the Yealm, near Cholwich Town. The row, extending over 700ft, consisted of uprights 2-3ft. high and 3ft. apart, the circle, at the northern end of the row, was 15ft. in diameter with seven upright stones. The site was excavated in 1961, and the sockets of many missing stones were found, also a pit 8ft. in diameter in the centre of the circle." Pollen analysis suggested the row was originally in a clearing of a wooded area.
Nearby sites: SX58456224

Collard Tor W. Stone Row

OS Map: SX55846203
NMR record: SX 56 SE 53
HER record: 2583
Megalithic Portal: 1843
The Stone Rows of GB: Collard Tor West
PMD: Collard Tor W Stone Row
Short Name: SR:CollardTo W
DPD: 57
Notes: Butler Collard Tor 2. Described in entry for Collard Tor E. Lethbridge pp.55-7, diagram p.55.
Nearby sites: SX55846203

Collard Tor E. Stone Row

OS Map: SX55856203
NMR record: SX 56 SE 53
HER record: 14792
Megalithic Portal: 1842
The Stone Rows of GB: Collard Tor East
PMD: Collard Tor E Stone Row
Short Name: SR:CollardTo E
DPD: 57
Notes: Butler Collard Tor 1. "Two stone rows each headed by a cairn lie on a gentle clitter-covered south-facing hillslope between 239m and 259m above OD. The rows which are oriented approximately north-south, diverge from their northern ends and are from 17m to 19 apart; a field bank interrupts the course of the east row. The precise lengths of the rows are difficult to determine partly because they appear to have been slighted and partly because of the presence of clitter and earthfast stones which hamper identification of the individual stones. The deduced lengths of these rows (excluding the cairns) are 75.4m and up to 97.2m respectively however because of the disturbed nature of each row these measurements are by no means certain. A count of the upright and clearly definable stones revealed 10 in the west row and 13 in the east row , but these figures provide a totally misleading picture of the somewhat jumbled and chaotic distribution of moorstones in each alignment. The heights of the uprights range from 0.3m to 0.9m with one very large damaged stone 1.3m high. Both cairns have been badly disturbed: the western mound is 8m across and 0.6m high and the eastern mound is 8.5 m across and 0.6m high". Lethbridge pp.55-7, diagram p.55.
Nearby sites: SX55856203

Shaugh Moor Stone Row

OS Map: SX55436342
NMR record: SX 56 SE 45
HER record: 2434
Megalithic Portal: 2121
The Stone Rows of GB: Shaugh Moor
PMD: Shaugh Moor Stone Row
Short Name: SR:ShaughMoor
DPD: 55
Notes: "A single stone row 587 feet long, the spacing of the stones varies between 3 feet and 5 feet, centre to centre. At the Southwest end there is a retaining circle 50 feet in diameter. The stones of the row are very small and sunk into the peat, making them hard to find. A stone row 164m long aligned SW-NE over the brow and down the south side of the valley. The terminals are not intervisible. It is composed of small stones, normally between 35 and 10cm high, the tallest (65cms) being at the apparent northern terminal. Where the stones have been removed their original positions can be identified from depressions in the turf". Lethbridge p.54-55, diagram p.55. See also: Sea Views at Shaugh Moor
Nearby sites: SX55436342

Trowlesworthy E. Stone Row

Trowlesworthy E. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Trowlesworthy, Settlements, Stone Row & Cairn Circle
OS Map: SX57646398
NMR record: SX 56 SE 38
HER record: 2421
Megalithic Portal: 3516
The Stone Rows of GB: Trowlesworthy 1
PMD: Trowlesworthy E Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Trowles E
DPD: 57
Notes: Butler Trowlesworthy 1. "A Bronze Age stone alignment comprising a double stone row consisting of 99 upright and 8 recumbent stones running south-south-west from a possible stone circle near the foot of the south flank of Little Trowlesworthy Tor. The surviving length of the row is about 129 metres, it is bisected by a leat. The better preserved element of the row is down the slope from the leat. The circle comprises 8 main orthostat stones in a "kidney-shaped" plan. The south-west orthostat in the ring is surrounded by a number of smaller stones". Lethbridge p.57-8, diagram p.58. See also, Legendary Dartmoor: The Pulpit and Sea Views at Trowlesworthy 1
Nearby sites: SX57646398

Trowlesworthy W. Stone Row

Trowlesworthy W. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Trowlesworthy, Settlements, Stone Row & Cairn Circle
OS Map: SX57556397
NMR record: SX 56 SE 15
HER record: 2415
Megalithic Portal: 2176
The Stone Rows of GB: Trowlesworthy 2
PMD: Trowlesworthy W Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Trowles W
DPD: 58
Notes: Butler Trowlesworthy 2. "A single stone row consisting of 35 upright and 13 recumbent stones running in an E to W line from the site of a possible ring cairn at the foot of the SW flank of Little Trowlesworthy Tor. The cairn at the head of the row is marked by a circle containing one upright and eight fallen small slabs and boulders. Within these is a slightly raised area, perhaps the remains of a cairn." Lethbridge p.57-8, diagram p.58.
Nearby sites: SX57556397

Ringmoor Down Stone Row

Ringmoor Down Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Ringmoor Stone Row & Cairn Circle
OS Map: SX56346581
NMR record: SX 56 NE 60
HER record: 3986
Megalithic Portal: 2102
The Stone Rows of GB: Ringmoor Down
PMD: Ringmoor Down Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Ringmoor
DPD: 34
Notes: "A stone row, 1740 feet long, mainly single but double in parts. At its southern end is a cairn circle with a diameter of 40ft. 6ins. In 1909 the circle was restored and five of the present stones were introduced from elsewhere. Prior to restoration one stone was standing, four had fallen and the presumed sites of six other stones were represented by pits. A 4ft long fallen stone terminated the stone row at its northern end". Lethbridge p.34-36, diagram p.34 site 3. See also: Sea Views at Ringmoor Down
Nearby sites: SX56346581

Drizzlecombe S. Stone Row

Drizzlecombe S. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Drizzlecombe Ceremonial Complex (Photos 1)
OS Map: SX59166696
NMR record: SX 56 NE 46
HER record: 14777
Megalithic Portal: 1905
The Stone Rows of GB: Drizzlecombe 1
PMD: Drizzlecombe A Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Drizzle S
DPD: 40
Notes: Butler Row 1, NMR Row 3, Worth Row A. See notes for Drizzlecombe B (N.W.) row. Lethbridge Row A pp.38-42. Diagram p.38. See also: Sea Views at Drizzlecombe 1
Nearby sites: SX59166696

Drizzlecombe N.W. Stone Row

Drizzlecombe N.W. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Drizzlecombe Ceremonial Complex (Photos 1)
OS Map: SX59256707
NMR record: SX 56 NE 43
HER record: 3376
Megalithic Portal: 1904
The Stone Rows of GB: Drizzlecombe 3
PMD: Drizzlecombe B Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Drizzle NW
DPD: 40
Notes: Butler Row 3, NMR Row 1, Worth Row B. The NW and S terminal stones have their broad face parallel to the row. The NW row is single for half of its 149.5m length uphill then double for 47m before becoming single again for the last 28m to the cairn. This arrangement appears to be the original design. The other two stone rows are single throughout. The S row is exactly the same length as the NW row but with smaller stones. The average interval between the stones is almost identical and the orientation of the row is such that it gently curves southwards downhill bringing the lower part of the row parallel to the S row. This shift of 7 degrees in alignment of the NW row from top to bottom to line up with the S row would suggest it was constructed later to match the S row. The height of the terminating stones for S and NW rows are 3m and 2.3m respectively. Lethbridge Row C. pp.38-42. Diagram p.38. See also: Sea Views at Drizzlecombe 3
Nearby sites: SX59256707

Drizzlecombe N.E. Stone Row

Drizzlecombe N.E. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Drizzlecombe Ceremonial Complex (Photos 1)
OS Map: SX59266705
NMR record: SX 56 NE 42
HER record: 14776
Megalithic Portal: 536
The Stone Rows of GB: Drizzlecombe 2
PMD: Drizzlecombe C Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Drizzle NE
DPD: 39
Notes: Butler Row 2, NMR Row 2, Worth Row C. Terminated by the tallest standing stone on Dartmoor. It is 4.2m in height with a distinctive bulging profile at the top the broad face is across the row unlike the other two Drizzlecombe rows. Interestingly this stone is photographed in Worth's Dartmoor prior to being re-erected. Worth suggests it was probably dragged here from Higher Hartor Tor about 1km away. This standing stone has 3 smaller cairns in close proximity. This is the shortest of the three rows at 83.2m but has larger slabs set further apart with the largest near the cairn. Lethbridge Row B. pp.38-42. Diagram p.38. See also: Sea Views at Drizzlecombe 2
Nearby sites: SX59266705

Hingston Hill (Down Tor) Stone Row

Hingston Hill (Down Tor) Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Down Tor Stone Row and Cairn Circle
OS Map: SX58696926
NMR record: SX 56 NE 29
HER record: 3502
Megalithic Portal: 1901
The Stone Rows of GB: Hingston Hill
PMD: Down Tor Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Down Tor
DPD: 28
Notes: "A stone alignment and cairn, situated on a saddle 620 metres east of Down Tor. The alignment is orientated east-north-east to west-south-west, running for 316 metres and containing at least 174 stones, with the tallest at either end. The westernmost stone stands 2.8 metre high, the easternmost stone stands 1.6 metres high, and the remainder vary between 1 metre and 0.2 metres in height. The westernmost stone, and an unknown number of others, were re-erected by Baring-Gould and Burnard in 1894. The cairn lies 4 metres west of the western end of the alignment. The cairn mound measures 8 metres in diameter and 0.7 metres high. It is surrounded by a kerb made up of 24 orthostats, standing between 0.3 and 1 metre high, forming a ring with a diameter of 11.5 metres. A hollow in the centre of the mound suggests partial early excavation or robbing. Two tin prospecting pits lie immediately against the edge of the kerb. The alignment is in direct line with another cairn to the north-east (438589)". Lethbridge pp.27-29, diagram p.27. See also: Sea Views at Hingston Hill
Nearby sites: SX58696926

Black Tor (Stanlake) Stone Row

Black Tor (Stanlake) Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: Sharpitor Area Stone Rows and Cists
OS Map: SX57107140
NMR record: SX 57 SE 35
HER record: 4994
Megalithic Portal: 1771
The Stone Rows of GB: Black Tor Stanlake
PMD: Black Tor Stanlake Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Stanlake
DPD: 24
Notes: "A Bronze Age Stone Row lies just inside, and is partly buried by, a substantial field boundary. The row extends from SX57217155 to SX57007137, some 294m long and includes at least 57 visible stones. Its north-eastern end is denoted by a substantial blocking stone and its lower south-western end by three funerary cairns. The row can be seen as three distinct parts forming the whole. The northern part includes 39 stones, the central group of 8 stones is separated from the northern row by a 66.2m wide gap whilst the southern group is on a slightly different alignment to the others. The row is unusual in that the blocking stone is at the upper end and a cairn lies at the lower end." Lethbridge diagram and photo p.24.
Nearby sites: SX57107140

Hart Tor North Stone Row

Hart Tor North Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Hart Tor Stone Row & Cairn Circle
OS Map: SX57727172
NMR record: SX 57 SE 32
HER record: 4896
Megalithic Portal: 1973
The Stone Rows of GB: Hart Tor North
PMD: Harter N Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Hart Tor N
DPD: 25
Notes: Butler Row 1. There are two cairns close by on the lower slopes of Hart Tor. One has an associated single stone row and the other has an associated double stone row - they diverge at an angle of 18 degrees. The double row consists of 93 stones and is much longer, around 122m in length [Gerrard], and extends all the way down to the River Meavy in the valley below. This row is fairly well preserved although it is crossed by a tinners ditch about a third of the way down its length and again by a leat a third of the way from the lower end. The structure was planned by Wilkinson in 1859 who states that the row is "terminated by a large monolith, now fallen, measuring about 25 feet long by 2 feet and 3 inches". Sadly this stone has long since disappeared. The row has pairs of stones which are spaced fairly accurately 1.9m apart along the rows, the rows being at a constant 1.7m separation. The cairn circle is 9.3m across and consists of 14 tall slabs some of which have fallen. Detailed survey of site in Hart Tor Stone Rows & Cairns, Meavy Valley Archaeology. Site Report No.9 - Sandy Gerrard (1999). See also: Sea Views at Hart Tor, The Stone Rows and Cairns at Hart Tor Dartmoor Part One and The Stone Rows and Cairns at Hart Tor Dartmoor Part Two
Nearby sites: SX57727172

Hart Tor South Stone Row

Hart Tor South Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Hart Tor Stone Row & Cairn Circle
OS Map: SX57727171
NMR record: SX 57 SE 32
HER record: 4895
Megalithic Portal: 1974
The Stone Rows of GB: Hart Tor South
PMD: Harter S Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Hart Tor S
DPD: 25
Notes: Butler Row 2. The single row consists of 16 stones and is 56.4m long, although Gerrard suggests it was probably once much longer. The single row leads to a cairn which does not have a retaining circle. The cairn which has been robbed measures 7.4m in diameter and up to 0.75m high. For early description of both rows and the now missing menhir, see: Wilkinson J. Gardner, British Remains on Dartmoor, Journal Brit. Arch. Assoc. xviii. pp.22-53 (1862). Detailed survey of site in Hart Tor Stone Rows & Cairns, Meavy Valley Archaeology. Site Report No.9 - Sandy Gerrard (1999). See also notes for Hart Tor North Stone Row. Sea Views at Hart Tor, The Stone Rows and Cairns at Hart Tor Dartmoor Part One and The Stone Rows and Cairns at Hart Tor Dartmoor Part Two
Nearby sites: SX57727171

Sharpitor N.W. 1 Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: Sharpitor Area Stone Rows and Cists
OS Map: SX55667061
NMR record: SX 57 SE 49
HER record: 3762
Megalithic Portal: 2118
The Stone Rows of GB: Sharpitor North West 1
PMD: Sharpitor Summit N Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Sharp NW1
DPD: 21
Notes: "The double stone row is in poor shape. Both terminals have survived fixing its length at 113m from the blocking stone to the centre of the cairn. The cairn (4.5 x 0.3) has lost its retaining circle and has been dug into in the centre. The other end of the row is well defined by a pair of larger slabs in the line of the rows followed by a central cross-set blocking stone 1.2m long that has been tipped backwards and is partly overgrown. The stones seemed to have increased in size nearer the cairn. Unusually the highest point on the ground is not at the cairn end but near the centre of the rows as they cross the summit of the ridge". Lethbridge pp.20-22. See also: Sea Views at Sharpitor NW 1
Nearby sites: SX55667061

Sharpitor N.W. 2 Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: Sharpitor Area Stone Rows and Cists
OS Map: SX55777064
NMR record: SX 57 SE 118
HER record: 3761
Megalithic Portal: 2119
The Stone Rows of GB: Sharpitor North West 2
PMD: Sharpitor Summit S Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Sharp NW2
DPD: 21
Notes: "A BA single stone row oriented NE - SW at a very slight angle to the north-east end of the adjacent double stone row. The large scale survey dated 1980 shows a total of thirty stones whilst in 1994 it was reported that only about 10 stones can be identified with certainty and half of these are either buried or just showing. The row is partially obscured by moorland grass and the area is heavily disturbed by grazing animals and walkers tracks. The extent of the row is unclear and there is no ground evidence of an associated cairn or a blocking stone. Heavy wear and tear of the fragile peat cover has caused many natural moorland stones to be exposed on the line of the row". Lethbridge pp.20-22. See also: Sea Views at Sharpitor NW 2
Nearby sites: SX55777064

Sharpitor E. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: Sharpitor Area Stone Rows and Cists
OS Map: SX56147078
NMR record: SX 57 SE 46
HER record: 4991
Megalithic Portal: 2117
The Stone Rows of GB: Sharpitor North East
PMD: Sharpitor E Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Sharpitor E
DPD: 21
Notes: Described by Worth as "Sharpitor, foot of eastern slope". Listed by Butler as Sharpitor N.E. (which can be confused with another alleged row). "A stone row, with a cairn at the west end at SX 56147078, extends almost due west for 26.0m. to SX 56167078. The cairn, mutilated and amorphous, is now approximately 6.7m in diameter and 0.3m. high at its maximum. There are nine stones in the row, including three pairs, with an additional stone which seems to be displaced, all between 0.1m. and 0.3m. high. The east end of the row is terminated by a reave (SX 67 SE 91) which has cut across and evidently destroyed any westward extension." Lethbridge pp.20-22.
Nearby sites: SX56147078

Merrivale A Stone Row

Merrivale A Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Merrivale Ceremonial Complex [Photo Set 1]
OS Map: SX55557482
NMR record: SX 57 SE 12
HER record: 14797
Megalithic Portal: 2044
The Stone Rows of GB: Merrivale 1
PMD: Merrivale A Stone Row
Short Name: SR:MerrivaleA
DPD: 16
Notes: Worth Merrivale A. Butler Merrivale 1. "Two Bronze Age double stone rows and associated cairns are located on open moorland. The rows are oriented roughly east to west and are almost parallel, being 25 metres between centres at their eastern ends increasing to 32 metres at the west. A leat still used to convey water to Hillside Stables separates the two monuments and flows to within 2 metres of the northern row. A single row (see SX 57 SE 115) runs roughly south-west from a small cairn at SX 55397476, some 4.75 metres south of the south row." Lethbridge pp.16-18, diagram p.16.
Nearby sites: SX55557482

Merrivale B Stone Row

Merrivale B Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Merrivale Ceremonial Complex [Photo Set 1]
OS Map: SX55447478
NMR record: SX 57 SE 12
HER record: 14795
Megalithic Portal: 117
The Stone Rows of GB: Merrivale 2
PMD: Merrivale B Stone Row
Short Name: SR:MerrivaleB
DPD: 16
Notes: Butler Merrivale 2. Worth Merrivale B. For description see Merrivale A. Lethbridge pp.16-18, diagram p.16.
Nearby sites: SX55447478

Merrivale C Stone Row

Merrivale C Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Merrivale Ceremonial Complex [Photo Set 1]
OS Map: SX55397475
NMR record: SX 57 SE 115
HER record: 5001
Megalithic Portal: 3391
The Stone Rows of GB: Merrivale 3
PMD: Merrivale C Stone Row
Short Name: SR:MerrivaleC
DPD: 17
Notes: Butler Merrivale 3. Worth Merrivale C. "A stone row and a small cairn lie to the south of the double stone rows in close-cropped moorland turf. The cairn located at the northern end and slightly off-centre to the row, measures 3.2m across and up to 0.5m high. An 0.3m deep central pit opens out on the southern side. There is no obvious kerb or cist but a transverse slab, the terminal slab of the row, is set within the south side of the mound. The existence of this slab suggest that the row pre-dates the mound. The stone row extends for 41.7m in a southerly direction to an upright stone (SX553774720). However, during the English Heritage 1999 survey a further stone was located on the same alignment beyond this stone indicating an overall length for the row of at least 60m. The new partially buried stone at SX55337484 is visible as a rounded stone 0.15m across; it is similar to others in the row. A total of six upright stones, six stones protruding through the turf and about ten slight depressions, now indicate this 60m long alignment. The transverse stone within the cairn is 0.5m by 0.4 and 0.15m thick. The two adjacent in line slabs are 0.6m 0.3m by 0.15m and 0.3 by 0.2 and 0.2m thick respectively. The other large stone (SX55377472) is 0.5 by 0.4 and up to 0.4m thick. The other stones are up to 0.15m high." Lethbridge pp.16-18 Row C, diagram p.16.
Nearby sites: SX55397475

Langstone Moor Stone Row

Langstone Moor Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Langstone Moor Stone Circle, Stone Row & Settlements
OS Map: SX55027886
NMR record: SX 57 NE 18
HER record: 4223
Megalithic Portal: 2016
The Stone Rows of GB: Langstone Moor
PMD: Langstone Moor I Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Langstone
DPD: 14
Notes: "A single stone row stands on Launceston (Langstone). Moor circa 330 feet in length, probably longer when complete. There are now only 18 stones, the largest of which stands only 18 inches above ground. At the north end are the remains of a barrow, now reduced to little more than a rubble ring. At the south end is the standing stone known as the 'Langstone', from which the moor probably takes its name. The stone was re-erected in 1893 and stands to a height of 9 feet 3 inches." Lethbridge p14, diagram p13.
Nearby sites: SX55027886

Cosdon Stone Row

Cosdon Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Cosdon Hill Triple Stone Row
OS Map: SX64329159
NMR record: SX 69 SW 17
HER record: 6886
Megalithic Portal: 1858
The Stone Rows of GB: Cosdon
PMD: Cosdon Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Cosdon
DPD: 152
Notes: "A triple stone row lies near the summit of Cosdon Hill and is 447 feet in length measured from the centre of the circled cairn which stands at the west end. At 225 feet from the west end there is a slight change in direction and the rows turn somewhat northward. This change of direction may be said to divide the row into western and an eastern section. Overall width, western part is 8 feet 10 inches, eastern part 10 feet 8 inches. The cairn is 26 feet in diameter and contains the remains of two cists; the retaining circle is very irregular. There is no formal feature to mark the termination of the rows at their eastern end"
Nearby sites: SX64329159

Shoveldown B Stone Row

Shoveldown B Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Shovel Down Ceremonial Complex
OS Map: SX65958601
NMR record: SX 68 NE 16
HER record: 6171
Megalithic Portal: 2129
The Stone Rows of GB: Shoveldown 2
PMD: Shovel Down A-B Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Shovel B
DPD: 139
Notes: Worth Row A. Butler Rows 2.

('B' SX 65968615 to SX 65968601) Double row to the east. Length 596 ft. Rows 3 ft 6in apart. Row is near Batworthy enclosure and has been much robbed; now just 12 pairs of stones and 15 single. Spacing of stones along the rows is around 6 ft. Two fallen stones next to the circle are much the largest in the row; one is 11 ft 6in, in length. and the other 7ft 4 in. The southern end of the row terminates in the Fourfold Circle (SX 68 NE 17). Lethbridge 139-145, diagram p.139.
Nearby sites: SX65958601

Shoveldown A Stone Row

Shoveldown A Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Shovel Down Ceremonial Complex
OS Map: SX65938604
NMR record: SX 68 NE 16
HER record: 6168
Megalithic Portal: 2130
The Stone Rows of GB: Shoveldown 3
PMD: Shovel Down E-F Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Shovel A
DPD: 139
Notes: Worth Row E, Butler Rows 3. ('A' SX 65898616 to SX 65938605).

Double row to the west of row B. Length 476 ft. Rows just over 4 ft apart but distance varies considerably along length. No special feature marks either end. Much robbed and single now along much of its length. Lethbridge 139-145, diagram p.139.
Nearby sites: SX65938604

Shoveldown C Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Shovel Down Ceremonial Complex
OS Map: SX65998590
NMR record: SX 68 NE 16
HER record: 14875
Megalithic Portal: 2127
The Stone Rows of GB: Shoveldown 4
PMD: Shovel Down C-D Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Shovel C
DPD: 139
Notes: Worth Row C, Butler Rows 4.

"('C' SX 65948601 to SX 65998590) A double row, 380 feet long, with an average distance of five feet between the rows. Most of the pairs of stones are complete and the southern end terminates in a barrow (SX 68 NE 34). No special feature marks the northern end." Lethbridge 139-145, diagram p.139.

"C: SX 65998592 to SX 65938602. A double row (83 stones visible July '78), with minor breaks; at 40 metres from the northern end it is overlain and mutilated by a reave and later hollow-way. The row terminates at the southern end on a cairn with the remains of a cist (SX 68 NE 34). The apparent north-westward extension as a single stone row, is a denuded probable Bronze Age reave (SX 68 NE 63)."
Nearby sites: SX65998590

Shoveldown E-F Stone Row

Shoveldown E-F Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Shovel Down Ceremonial Complex
OS Map: SX66028567
NMR record: SX 68 NE 16
HER record: 6179
Megalithic Portal: 2126
The Stone Rows of GB: Shoveldown 5
PMD: Shovel Down G Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Shovel E-F
DPD: 139
Notes: Worth Row G, Butler Rows 5 & 6

('E')SX 66028581 to SX 66028567) A double row, 485 feet long with 3 1/4 feet between the rows which run almost due north and south, and terminates in a standing stone known as the Longstone (SX 68 NE 39). Fairly complete at the northern end but more ragged towards the south.

('F' SX66028567 to SX 66038549) A double row continuing on almost the same alignment as ('E'), 555 feet long and terminating in a single standing stone, the sole survivor of the Three Boys (SX 68 NE 40). Only a few set stones survive but Ormerod (a) states that in 1858 the pits left by the removal of the other stones of the double row could still be seen.

Lethbridge 139-145, diagram p.139.
Nearby sites: SX66028567

Shoveldown D-G-H-J Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Shovel Down Ceremonial Complex
OS Map: SX66018586
NMR record: SX 68 NE 16
HER record: 6181
Megalithic Portal: 2128
The Stone Rows of GB: Shoveldown 1
PMD: Shovel Down H-K Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Shovel DGHJ
DPD: 139
Notes: Worth Row H, Butler Row 1. This row is considered to be one long partially robbed row - previously listed as four separate rows:-

"D: SX 66028583 to SX 66048568. A single row (47 stones visible July '78) 149.0m long, with no terminal features; it curves slightly to the south west Worth (2) extends it as a reave for a further 50.0m to the north but this extension is straight, on a different alignment, and almost certainly a separate row (see G)."

"G: SX 66008591 to SX 66028585. A single row (25 stones visible July '78), 60.0m long; two gaps (? stone robbing) of 6.0m & 8.0m occur towards the north end. The north penultimate stone (now recumbent) is of much larger slab-like proportions and may have originally served as a blocking-stone."

"H: SX 65998599 to SX 65998595. A single row (24 stones visible July '78), 51.0m long with three gaps of from 5.0m to 8.0m recorded by Pettit (3), but not Worth (2)."

"J: SX 65978625 to SX 65988603. A single row (46 stones visible July '78), 228.0m long, there are no special terminal features. Many gaps of from 3.0m to 47.0m occur throughout the entire length of the row. The southern end has probably been overlain by a later reave (SX 68 NE 63). The northern end most probably extended further northward, and it would appear to have been destroyed by a mining 'rake' of circa 19th century date, and stone robbing? for the nearby Batworthy enclosure walls."
Lethbridge 139-145, diagram p.139.
Nearby sites: SX66018586

Fernworthy S.W. Stone Row

Fernworthy S.W. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Fernworthy Stone Circle
OS Map: SX65488410
NMR record: SX 68 SE 59
HER record: 14886
Megalithic Portal: 1934
The Stone Rows of GB: Fernworthy 3
PMD: Fernworthy A Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Fernwthy SW
DPD: 138
Notes: Butler Row 3. "A disturbed double stone row is centred SX 65488408. It is 21m long and is oriented N to S. At the N end is a cairn (SX 68 SE 58) offset slightly W of the alignment of the row. Beyond this to the N is Fernworthy Stone Circle (SX 68 SE 56). The S end of the row is not very well preserved. The plan of 1898 depicts it terminating at a stone in the face of a wall, although the wall has since been removed. The stones in the row average 0.5m to 0.6m tall and lie in an area of amorphous modern earthworks up to 0.3m deep." DNP Post 1D.
Nearby sites: SX65488410

Fernworthy N. Stone Row

Fernworthy N. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Fernworthy Stone Circle
OS Map: SX65538429
NMR record: SX 68 SE 55
HER record: 6562
Megalithic Portal: 1933
The Stone Rows of GB: Fernworthy 1
PMD: Fernworthy B Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Fernwthy N
DPD: 138
Notes: Butler Row 1. "To the N of Fernworthy stone circle is a double stone row. At its N end are the disturbed remains of a barrow. The row survives well for 125m although beyond this (to the N) it has been heavily disturbed by forestry activity as far as the barrow. The plan of 1898, made prior to afforestation, shows the N end of the double row as already `buried or lost'. The surviving part of the double row contains paired, low stones 0.8m to 1.4m apart, averaging 0.3m high, although many are flush with the ground. The tallest stones are at the S end. The alignment of the row is tangential to the circle (SX 68 SE 56). The barrow at the N end of the row measures 6m in diameter, although it is very amorphous due to tree planting. there is a large proportion of stone in the centre of the low mound, as well as some amorphous scarping and one large upright slab." DNP Post 8D
Nearby sites: SX65538429

Fernworthy S.E. Stone Row

Fernworthy S.E. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Fernworthy Stone Circle
OS Map: SX65498408
NMR record: SX 68 SE 93
HER record: 6556
Megalithic Portal: 10484
The Stone Rows of GB: Fernworthy 2
PMD: Fernworthy C Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Fernwthy SE
DPD: 138
Notes: Butler Row 2. "Centred at SX 65518404 is a cairn. 45m to the N at SX 65508409 is a barrow containing the remains of a cist. Between the two are the very fragmented remains of an alleged double stone row running N to S parallel to another row (SX 68 SE 59) which leads towards Fernworthy Stone Circle. The row, barrow and cairn have all been comprehensively damaged by afforestation and the digging of the adjacent drainage channels. Seven stones survive of an alignment but there is little evidence that it was a double row. The barrow at the N end of the row measures up to 6m in diameter and is 0.4m high, although its shape is obscured by drainage channels. The cist in the centre is represented by two stones set at right angles, 0.4m tall internally. The cairn at the S end of the row measures 7.3m N to S by 8.5m and is 0.5m high. There is a large amount of surface stone on and around it." DNP Post 5D.
Nearby sites: SX65498408

Assycombe Stone Row

Assycombe Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Assycombe Double Stone Row
OS Map: SX66058260
NMR record: SX 68 SE 4
HER record: 6537
Megalithic Portal: 1738
The Stone Rows of GB: Assycombe Stone Row
PMD: Assycombe Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Assycombe
DPD: 135
Notes: "Bronze Age stone row and cairn, Assycombe. The double stone row is 120m long terminating in the cairn at the North-East end. The South-West end is blocked by a stone 2.0m high, re-erected there by Baring-Gould. The cairn is 8.4m in diameter and 0.6m high. Scheduled." Also from Burnard's 1892 field notes: The row, which starts from a ruined cairn, consists of 84 standing stones, and extends 800 feet E. and W., running in two rows down the hill towards Assycombe. It terminates towards the W. in a stone lying prone, 5' 9" long. 2'' wide. The avenue is from 5' to 6' wide, inner measurement. The stones composing the row are 18" high, and down to 6".
Nearby sites: SX66058260

Hurston Ridge Stone Row

Hurston Ridge Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Hurston Ridge Double Stone Row
OS Map: SX67298249
NMR record: SX 68 SE 10
HER record: 6541
Megalithic Portal: 8345
The Stone Rows of GB: Hurston Ridge
PMD: Hurston Ridge Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Hurston
DPD: 136
Notes: .Worth: Watern Hill. "A stone alignment which includes two parallel lines of upright stones leading downslope for 143 metres from a round cairn. The lower end of the alignment is denoted by a blocking stone. Midway along the alignment a length of later enclosure walling crosses the row. The cairn at the upper end of the alignment measures 5.9 metres in diameter and stands up to a height of 0.6 metres. A large slab denoting the north eastern edge of the cairn may represent a second blocking stone of the associated alignment. A cinerary urn was found in the cairn." A number of the stones were restored to their original sockets in 1894. A broken hand axe was discovered in the pit in which one of the stones had stood near to the menhir next to the cairn.
Nearby sites: SX67298249

White Ridge Stone Row

White Ridge Stone Row

OS Map: SX65408156
NMR record: SX 68 SE 22
HER record: 6642
Megalithic Portal: 4145
The Stone Rows of GB: White Ridge
PMD: White Ridge Stone Row
Short Name: SR:White Ridge
DPD: 125
Notes: "A double stone row, 620 ft in length from the centre of a cairn at the north end, running nearly due south and slightly downhill. Well preserved at the north end for a short distance but becoming more dilapidated as it approaches the newtake wall at the south end". Lethbridge diagram p.124 and photo top p.125.
Nearby sites: SX65408156

Challacombe Down Stone Row

Challacombe Down Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Challacombe Down Triple Stone Row
OS Map: SX68968086
NMR record: SX 68 SE 28
HER record: 6600
Megalithic Portal: 1819
The Stone Rows of GB: Challacombe Down
PMD: Challacombe Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Challacombe
DPD: 126
Notes: "Bronze Age triple stone row well marked and wider apart at the north, drawing nearer to the south where they meet a blocking stone of unusual size. The stones have suffered little in their restoration except that a stone in the middle row was turned to form a blocking stone for that row. The loose stones scattered to the west of the north end have been suggested to form a stone circle and additional rows but may be stones excavated from the north end of the stone row."
Nearby sites: SX68968086

Trendlebere Down Stone Row

OS Map: SX76627924
NMR record: SX 77 NE 2
HER record: 8076
Megalithic Portal: 2171
The Stone Rows of GB: Trendlebere Down
PMD: Trendlebeare Down Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Trendlebere
DPD: 151
Notes: "A stone row 100ft. to the north of the Haytor-Manaton road." 18 stones of the stone row can be identified of which 9 are fallen and 9 upright stones. The fallen stones vary in length between 3'4" and 4'6"; the upright ones between 6" and 2'4".
Nearby sites: SX76627924

Yar Tor Stone Row

Yar Tor Stone Row

OS Map: SX68147393
NMR record: SX 67 SE 10
HER record: 6459
Megalithic Portal: 2199
The Stone Rows of GB: Yar Tor
PMD: Yar Tor Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Yar Tor
DPD: 122
Notes: "The remains of a probable triple stone row with a cairn and cist at its south end and a barrow at its north. The row comprises stones set 2m apart and standing to a height of 0.3m. Some are concealed beneath the turf. The cairn measures 11m in diameter and 0.3m high with a central cist surrounded by a kerb. The barrow is 6m in diameter and 1m high". Lethbridge Corndon Triple Row pp.122-3. See also: Sea Views at Yar Tor
Nearby sites: SX68147393

Laughter Tor E. Stone Row

Laughter Tor E. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Laughter Tor Stone Row
OS Map: SX65217539
NMR record: SX 67 NE 28
HER record: 53417
Megalithic Portal: 2017
The Stone Rows of GB: Laughter Tor 1
PMD: Laugh Tor I Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Laugh Tor E
DPD: 122
Notes: Butler Laughter 1. Double row interrupted by a new-take wall. row is robbed near wall. "Bronze Age standing stone 2.65 metres high, 0.7 metres wide and 0.52 metres thick, set into a small cairn. About 18 metres to the south east is a double stone row orientated north west to south east and consisting of at least 23 upright stones and a further 9 displaced ones averaging about 1.7 metres apart. The standing stone was re-erected in 1893 and again in 1911 and the cairn was excavated in 1903". Lethbridge pp.121-122.
Nearby sites: SX65217539

Lakehead Hill 4 (E of Summit) Stone Row

Lakehead Hill 4 (E of Summit) Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Lakehead Hill
OS Map: SX64517761
NMR record: SX 67 NW 32
HER record: 5873
Megalithic Portal: 2011
The Stone Rows of GB: Lakehead Hill East
PMD: Lakehead Great Cairn Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Lakehead 4E
DPD: 116
Notes: "A stone alignment and a cairn with cist lying on a gentle slope near the summit of Lakehead Hill. The stone alignment survives as a single row of at least 11 stones leading westward towards the cairn and cist. The cairn measures 6.7 metres in diameter and is defined by several edge set stones, which in turn surround a large restored cist formed by five substantial upright slabs supporting a capstone measuring 2.2 metre long by 1.55 metres wide and 0.3 metres thick." (E. Dart). Lethbridge diagram p.114 and photos p.116.
Nearby sites: SX64517761

Lakehead Hill Summit Stone Row

Lakehead Hill Summit Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Lakehead Hill
OS Map: SX64377766
NMR record: SX 67 NW 64
HER record: 5930
Megalithic Portal: 2010
The Stone Rows of GB: Lakehead Hill Summit
PMD: Lakehead Hill 3 Stone Row
Short Name: SR:LakeheadSum
DPD: 115
Notes: "A stone alignment lying on a gentle slope near the summit of Lakehead Hill. It includes a 22 metre long, single row of at least 12 stones standing up to 0.75 metres high, aligned east to west." (E. Dart). Lethbridge diagram p.114 and photo bottom p.115.
Nearby sites: SX64377766

Lakehead Hill S.W. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Lakehead Hill
OS Map: SX64187730
NMR record: SX 67 NW 13
HER record: 5844
Megalithic Portal: 45595
PMD: Lakehead Hill 6 Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Lakehead SW
Notes: "Alleged Stone row recorded in 1946 but covered by a forestry plantation in 1979. At that time, 3 stones were visible, but it was uncertain whether they were part of the stone row. It may have been destroyed or covered by humus." (River: Dart/Cherry Brook)
Nearby sites: SX64187730

Conies Down Stone Row

Conies Down Stone Row

OS Map: SX58577897
NMR record: SX 57 NE 5
HER record: 4592
Megalithic Portal: 1846
The Stone Rows of GB: Conies Down
PMD: Conies Down Stone Row
Short Name: SR:ConiesDown
DPD: 107
Notes: "The Conies Down stone row is oriented a few degrees west of north-south and is 145m long. Originally a double alignment of stones, only three pairs of upright stones now survive. There are a total of 17 upright and 15 recumbent stones. The average gap between stones is 10m and between the pairs the gap is some 1.4m wide". Lethbridge diagram p.107.
Nearby sites: SX58577897

Black Tor (Avon) Stone Row

Black Tor (Avon) Stone Row

OS Map: SX67736348
NMR record: SX 66 SE 73
HER record: 5778
Megalithic Portal: 1772
The Stone Rows of GB: Black Tor Avon Stone Row
PMD: Black Tor Avon Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Black Tor
DPD: 85
Notes: "A stone row running north west - south east seen on the plateau west of Black Tor". The stones are very hidden and difficult to see. The row is headed at the NW end by two small cairns. Lethbridge suggests remains of cist in one of them, diagram p.85. See also HER 5752, SX 66 SE 89 and SX 66 SE 33
Nearby sites: SX67736348

Corringdon Ball N. Stone Row

Corringdon Ball N. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Corringdon Ball Chambered Tomb & Stone Rows
OS Map: SX66666120
NMR record: SX 66 SE 43
HER record: 5656
Megalithic Portal: 1856
The Stone Rows of GB: Corringdon Ball North
PMD: Corringdon Ball A Stone Row
Short Name: SR:CorringdonN
DPD: 82
Notes: "A single stone row, length 157 metres, spacing 1.0 metres, starting on the east with a cairn, diameter 6.7 metres, previously opened. The first stone of the row lies 18 metres west of the cairn's centre; there has been considerable robbery for the benefit of modern stone walls. The row clearly extends for 157 metres from the centre of the cairn, but with long intervals between the last stones. The stones are small, the highest being 635 millimetres." See also entry for Corringdon Ball Row B. p.82
Nearby sites: SX66666120

Corringdon Ball S. Stone Row

Corringdon Ball S. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Corringdon Ball Chambered Tomb & Stone Rows
OS Map: SX66646119
NMR record: SX 66 SE 43
HER record: 5655
Megalithic Portal: 1857
The Stone Rows of GB: Corringdon Ball South
PMD: Corringdon Ball B Stone Row
Short Name: SR:CorringdonS
DPD: 82
Notes: "Corringdon ball stone rows. Six or seven rows of small stones approximately 75m long, terminating at the east end in a small semi-circular stone setting of five stones, none more than 500mm high, and the alignments are irregular - they run along the contours. Situated on the open moor between the east and west glaze brooks. A complicated set of stones which can only be aligned into rows by exact survey. The direction of the rows is approximately south west". Described by R H Worth as two triple rows B & C. See also HER 14802 (Corringdon Ball B).
Nearby sites: SX66646119

Brent Fore Hill Stone Row

Brent Fore Hill Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: The Neolithic tombs of Cuckoo Ball & Corringdon Ball
OS Map: SX66776129
NMR record: SX 66 SE 44
HER record: 5765
Megalithic Portal: 1777
The Stone Rows of GB: Brent Fore Hill
PMD: Brent Fore Hill Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Brent Fore
DPD: 83
Notes: "The remains of a stone row and cairn on Brent Fore Hill. The row is crossed by two leats, one of which is now disused. The cairn is visible as a low mound of turf-covered stones of 13.5 metres in diameter and 0.3 metres high". Lethbridge East Glaze Brook stone row p.83. See also: Sea Views at Brent Fore Hill
Nearby sites: SX66776129

Glasscombe Corner Stone Row

Glasscombe Corner Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: The stone rows of Butterdon Hill, Piles Hill & Glasscombe
OS Map: SX66106080
NMR record: SX 66 SE 49
HER record: 5661
Megalithic Portal: 3254
The Stone Rows of GB: Glasscombe Corner
PMD: Glasscombe Corner Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Glasscombe
DPD: 81
Notes: "A stone row partly double and partly single ending on the remains of a cairn circle. The length of the double row is 111.0m. and of the single row 61.0m, the total length to the centre of the cairn circle being 177.0m". Lethbridge Avon Valley stone row pp.81-82, diagram p.81.
Nearby sites: SX66106080

Cantrell Stone Row

Cantrell Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Cuckoo Ball Chambered Tomb
OS Map: SX65685715
NMR record: SX 65 NE 44
HER record: 2889
Megalithic Portal: 1798
The Stone Rows of GB: Cantrell
PMD: Cantrell Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Cantrell
DPD: 80
Notes: "A double stone row, with a cairn at the north-east end, lies near the moor gate at Cantrell, Ugborough Moor. The southern row consists of nine stones, one of which is almost buried and one has fallen. The length of the row from the centre of the cairn is 153 feet and the alignment is N44o 20' E. The rows are from 7 to 12 feet apart and the stones are about 5 feet 6 inches apart, centre to centre. The cairn has a diameter of 22 feet and encloses what may be the remains of a cist".
Nearby sites: SX65685715

Soussons Down (Red Barrows) Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Soussons Cairn Circle
OS Map: SX67677998
NMR record: SX 67 NE 233
HER record: 6015
Megalithic Portal: 2136
The Stone Rows of GB: Soussons Down
PMD: Red Barrows Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Red Barrows
Notes: Triple row destroyed in 1946 Butler Vol. 5 p38, Vol. 3 Map 24.2 p.19. The row was associated with a cairn about 300m north of the four Red Barrow cairn group (SX 67 NE 3).
Nearby sites: SX67677998

Yellowmead Stone Row

Yellowmead Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Yellowmead 4-fold Cairn Circle
OS Map: SX57486784
NMR record: SX 56 NE 18
HER record: 3338
Megalithic Portal: 2202
The Stone Rows of GB: Yellowmead Down
PMD: Yellowmead Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Yellowmead
DPD: 31
Notes: "A group of four concentric stone circles of which the innermost one is considered to be a cairn circle. Three stones were standing in 1921 when all the fallen stones were raised during restoration. There also appears to have been a stone row leading away from the stone circles." and "The double row as planned by Worth except that one stone is now missing. It is 6.9m long with mostly small line slabs, set on edge. They are about 0.3m long and 0.3m high, the intervals between stones and between the rows being 0.8m".
Nearby sites: SX57486784

Sharpitor W. (Peek Hill) Stone Row

Sharpitor W. (Peek Hill) Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: Sharpitor Area Stone Rows and Cists
OS Map: SX55067075
NMR record: SX 57 SE 72
HER record: 12831
Megalithic Portal: 2120
The Stone Rows of GB: Sharpitor West
PMD: Sharpitor W Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Sharpitor W
DPD: 20
Notes: Butler: Sharpitor W, Worth: Peek Hill. Near Horseyeat Farm. "BA stone row and cairn. The 132m long row has 47 upright stones and the low cairn is 8.4m in diameter. Both monuments lie under dense bracken cover; gorse vegetation has obscured part of the row". Lethbridge pp.19-20, diagram p.19, photo p.20 Horseyeat Farm stone row. See also: Sea Views at Sharpitor West
Nearby sites: SX55067075

Piles Hill Stone Row

Piles Hill Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Piles Hill Double Stone Row and Cairns
OS Map: SX65056110
NMR record: SX 66 SE 86
HER record: 5662
Megalithic Portal: 2080
The Stone Rows of GB: Piles Hill
PMD: Piles Hill Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Piles Hill
DPD: 74
Notes: "The double stone row formed by 139 stones, 7 of which lean; the others are either stumps with drill marks, cleanly snapped off stones, or recumbent posts, whole or split by drilling. Some 30 stones exceed 2.0m. in length with a maximum of 3.0m. A few take the form of slabs or boulders but the majority are of post-type up to 0.6m. square in section, with an angled top created by a single 'chamfer'. The rows in the main alignment are from 21.0m. to 30.0m. apart and within them the gaps between stones vary from 3.0m. to 30.0m. At each end the rows are close, 12.0m. to 17.0m. apart with fewer large gaps between stones". Lethbridge pp.74-6, diagram p.74.
Nearby sites: SX65056110

Higher White Tor Stone Row

Higher White Tor Stone Row

OS Map: SX61947842
NMR record: SX 67 NW 6
HER record: 5834
Megalithic Portal: 2192
The Stone Rows of GB: Higher White Tor
PMD: Higher White Tor Stone Row
Short Name: SR:HigherWhito
DPD: 110
Notes: "A Late Neolithic stone alignment on Higher White Tor, surviving as two parallel rows of stones aligned roughly north-south. The alignment is 95.4 metres long and contains twelve upright stones and 24 recumbent ones." Lethbridge diagram and photo p.110.
Nearby sites: SX61947842

Shell Top S.W. Stone Row

OS Map: SX59466315
NMR: No record found
HER record: 48897
Megalithic Portal: 36955
The Stone Rows of GB: Shell Top South West
PMD: Shell Top Stone Row
Short Name: SR:ShellTop SW
DPD: 60
Notes: Not listed in NMR. Discovered by Lethbridge in 1992. Butler Vol. 3 Map 51.9. Oval cairn at the higher end. Orientated just west of north and 73.5 m from the cairn is a massive fallen longstone 2.7 m long which is probably the terminal stone of the row. There are 31 of 47 original stones visible in the row, all but a few either flat or leaning. Lethbridge p.59-61 diagram p.59, 61.
Nearby sites: SX59466315

Holne Moor Stone Row

Holne Moor Stone Row

OS Map: SX67447105
NMR record: SX 67 SE 72
HER record: 12983
Megalithic Portal: 1981
The Stone Rows of GB: Holne Moor
PMD: Holne Moor Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Holne Moor
DPD: 90
Notes: "A standing stone and triple stone row lying in a secluded position, across the head of a shallow, north facing valley. It measures 147 metres long with rows on average 1.5 m apart. The stones, fifty three of which were located, have a maximum height of 0.2 m and are spaced about 1.1 m apart, each opposite the stone of the adjacent row. There is also a possible former standing stone which is now recumbent."
Nearby sites: SX67447105

Merrivale (Menhir 1) Stone Row

Merrivale (Menhir 1) Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Merrivale Ceremonial Complex [Photo Set 1]
OS Map: SX55357458
NMR record: SX 57 SE 9
HER record: 53397
Megalithic Portal: 3388
The Stone Rows of GB: Merrivale 4
PMD: Merrivale Menhir I Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Mer Menhir
DPD: 17
Notes: Butler Row 4. Prehistoric Monuments of Dartmoor website Menhir 1. "Stone row 4 is now a trivial affair [Butler] of 3 small slabs aligned towards a squarish block near the base of the standing stone. This area has suffered some damage over the past century. There were 5 stones in 1895, the missing one presumably accounted for by the pit which has appeared between the upper stones. This may well be the site of the cairn, C4, at the head of the rows recorded by Rowe but not included in the plans of Lukis or Worth. Nor is there much surviving from the circle of slabs around the menhir depicted in Bray's plan and recorded by Spence Bate in 1871, or the nearby cist which he excavated, C5. The Exploration Committee excavated at both ends of the row but no more socket holes were found and they concluded that this short alignment was complete." Lethbridge pp.16-18, diagram p.16.
Nearby sites: SX55357458

Leeden Tor Stone Row

Leeden Tor Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: Sharpitor Area Stone Rows and Cists
OS Map: SX56547146
NMR record: SX 57 SE 104
HER record: 50223
Megalithic Portal: 2020
The Stone Rows of GB: Leeden Tor
PMD: Leeden Tor Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Leeden Tor
DPD: 23
Notes: "BA cairn and stone row. The scrappy remains of a single stone row now 165m long descend from a badly battered cairn on the south-east slopes of Leeden Tor. The cairn is about 6m across with a large central pit and partial retaining circle. At least 14 stones remain in a line, four only still earthfast and the rest either flat or buried. Stone pits record the loss of some of the stones". Lethbridge p23, diagram p.24. See also: Sea Views at Leeden Tor
Nearby sites: SX56547146

Butter Brook S Stone Row

Butter Brook S Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: The Neolithic tombs of Cuckoo Ball & Corringdon Ball
OS Map: SX65115989
NMR record: SX 65 NE 71
HER record: 13166
Megalithic Portal: 1971
The Stone Rows of GB: Butterbrook 1
PMD: Butter Brook 1 Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Butter Br S
DPD: 78
Notes: "A stone row about 42 metres long is situated on south sloping ground at SX 65145995, just north of the marshy Butterbrook valley. It is aligned south south west/north north east, and terminates at the south end in a hollow-centred ring of turf and stones of 2.5 metres diameter east/west, 3.2 metres north/south. The first stone in the row is 10.35 metres from the centre of the terminal, thereafter the spacing becomes about 3 metres. The maximum height of the stones is 0.67 metre. The row becomes double for about 12.5 metres (four to five pairs of stones), with a distance of 0.4 to 0.5 metre between rows, after which only the second row appears to continue." Lethbridge p.78 Rows 4/5 diagram p.77. Formerly listed as Butter Brook 1
Nearby sites: SX65115989

Butter Brook N Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Walk: The Neolithic tombs of Cuckoo Ball & Corringdon Ball
OS Map: SX65205998
NMR record: SX 65 NE 71
HER record: 13166
Megalithic Portal: 1970
The Stone Rows of GB: Butterbrook 2
PMD: Butter Brook 2 Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Butter Br N
DPD: 78
Notes: Continued notes from Butter Brook S. "At 73 metres from the terminal there is a single orthostat 0.5 metre high, standing 3.25 metres off centre south from the projection of the rows, at the edge of a small clitter of broken stones. A third row, irregularly spaced and not showing much above ground,
meets the double section of the rows at an angle of about 10o on the north-west side, extending westward to about level with the terminal. Visual projection east-ward along the third row appears to be in line with the orthostat". Lethbridge 78 Rows 4/5 diagram p.77. Formerly listed as Butter Brook 2.
Nearby sites: SX65205998

Lakehead Hill S.E. Stone Row

Lakehead Hill S.E. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Lakehead Hill
OS Map: SX64717739
NMR record: SX 67 NW 35
HER record: 5875
Megalithic Portal: 44544
The Stone Rows of GB: Lakehead Hill 2
PMD: Lakehead Hill 2 Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Lakehead SE
DPD: 118
Notes: "The cist was examined in 1895/6 but nothing was found. It was surrounded by a double retaining circle and a stone row lead from it north west, of which ten stones remained, but these had sunk into the bog leaving only their tops showing". "The stone row which falls in an afforested area could not be
identified and has probably been destroyed."(1979) (E. Dart).
Nearby sites: SX64717739

Treeland Brake Stone Row

OS Map: SX67276141
NMR record: SX 66 SE 120
HER record: 5827
Megalithic Portal: 6333473
The Stone Rows of GB: Treeland Brake
PMD: Treeland Brake Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Treeland Bk
Notes: Notes from the NMR record: "Treeland Brake Stone Row. The only record of the row is a photograph taken by Mr HG Hurrell in the late 1950s. Mr Hurrell remembers about five erect stones and about five fallen, aligned north-east to south-west. The row has been destroyed by agricultural activity by 1977. (Photograph is in the possession of S & M Register)." Also: "A colour print taken by Mr Hurrell from approximately SX 67206130 shows the stones aligned to a field corner at SX 67296147. Approximate centre of row, SX 67276141; the area is now under pasture."
Nearby sites: SX67276141

Laughter Tor W. Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Laughter Tor Stone Row
OS Map: SX65197539
NMR record: SX 67 NE 94
HER record: 6002
Megalithic Portal: 2017
The Stone Rows of GB: Laughter Tor 2
PMD: Laugh Tor II Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Laugh Tor W
DPD: 122
Notes: Butler Laughter 2. "A double stone row at about 395m OD cuts across the gentle SW projecting spur of Laughter Tor in an area of heather and rough grass some 12m WSW of the standing stone 'Laughter Man'. The stones, although all relatively small in size, form two good slightly curving rows oriented about 295 degs. and 0.7m to 1.2m apart, consisting of thirteen stones extending from SX 6519075381 some 15m ESE to SX 6520475375. Now visible are six stones in each row with a single stone at the NW end. Originally there may have been at least ten in each row at intervals of about 1.2m". Lethbridge pp.121-122.
Nearby sites: SX65197539

Scorhill Stone Row

Prehistoric Dartmoor Walks: Dartmoor Site: Scorhill Stone Circle
OS Map: SX65478720
NMR record: SX 68 NE 26
HER: No record found
Megalithic Portal: 25238
PMD: Scorhill Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Scorhill
DPD: 146
Notes: N. Teign. Claimed by Butler. Not mentioned on NMR or HER.
Nearby sites: SX65478720

Stannon Newtake Stone Row

OS Map: SX65348108
NMR record: SX 68 SE 125
HER record: 54555
Megalithic Portal: 2144
The Stone Rows of GB: Stannon Newtake
PMD: Stannon Newtake Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Stannon New
Notes: Possible extension of the White Ridge Stone Row. "Standing stones, possibly a stone row. Forty-six feet S. of the cairn (SX 68 SE 23) are two standing stones, two and a half feet high, their broad planes facing the monument. These, and two others in line, suggest the remains of a stone row, destroyed for materials for an ancient hedge. If a row, it does not point to the centre of the cairn. "
Nearby sites: SX65348108

Holne Ridge Stone Row

Holne Ridge Stone Row

OS Map: SX66737109
NMR record: SX 67 SE 60
HER record: 61453
Megalithic Portal: 27341
The Stone Rows of GB: Holne Ridge
PMD: Holne Ridge Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Holne Ridge
DPD: 90
Notes: "One or two cairns and a short probably unfinished stone row lie in the north west facing hollow above Horse Ford on the O Brook. The cairn described by Authority 2 lies at the south end of the site with the surviving stones of the stone row to the north. As so few stones survive the exact form and extent of the rows is impossible to determine but there may have been as many as three parallel rows approximately 1.0 metre apart. Overlying or abutting the east row at SX 6672 7109 is a low turf covered mound 3.0 metes in diameter and 0.4 metres high. It is not clear whether this feature forms part of the monument or if it is associated with the shallow turf cuttings to the east."
Nearby sites: SX66737109

Hameldown N.E. Stone Row

OS Map: SX71488008
NMR: No record found
HER record: 18865
Megalithic Portal: 6333472
The Stone Rows of GB: Hameldown
PMD: Berry Pound Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Hamel NE
Notes: No NMR listing. HER record MDV18865. Described in Butler Volume 1 Map 20.3. To the south of Berry Pound is a small longhouse. "Within the abandoned field 250m south of the longhouse are the probable remains of a single row first recorded in 1983. Five or six stones remain in line up to 206m apart, the rest having been removed or buried when the field was ploughed."
Nearby sites: SX71488008

Sherberton Stone Row

OS Map: SX63887335
NMR: No record found
HER record: 6426
Megalithic Portal: 6333470
The Stone Rows of GB: Sherberton Row
PMD: Sherberton Common Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Sherberton
DPD: 100
Notes: The Sherberton double row was discovered in 1997. It is an unimpressive double row of small stones a short distance north-west of the Sherberton Circle. For a plan see Butler Vol. 5 p. 210-12. Lethbridge pp.99-100, diagram p.99 and p.100.
Nearby sites: SX63887335

Cut Hill Stone Row

Cut Hill Stone Row

OS Map: SX59928275
NMR record: SX 58 SE 84
HER record: 69604
Megalithic Portal: 25916
The Stone Rows of GB: Cut Hill
PMD: Cut Hill Stone Row
Short Name: SR:Cut Hill
DPD: 130
Notes: Discovered in 2004. Prehistoric stone row of 6-7 large granite slabs near the summit of Cut Hill. All the slabs are recumbent with one buried. The row is thought to date back earlier than 3,500BC. For more information, see: Prehistoric Society - Past No. 47, HER MDV69604 and Legendary Dartmoor
Nearby sites: SX59928275

Tottiford 1 & 2 Stone Row

OS Map: SX81008270
NMR: No record found
HER record: 102540
Megalithic Portal: 24205
The Stone Rows of GB: Tottiford Reservoir 1
PMD: Tottiford Reservoir Stone Rows
Short Name: SR:Tottiford
Notes: Excavated during the Time Team dig in 2011. Will be normally covered by the Tottiford Reservoir. See Wessex Archaeology report Tottiford Reservoir: Archaeological Evaluation and Assessment of Results. See also Legendary Dartmoor - Time Team at Tottiford.
Nearby sites: SX81008270

Yardworthy Stone Row

OS Map: SX67608439
NMR record: SX 68 SE 133
HER record: 61337
Megalithic Portal: 6333471
The Stone Rows of GB: Yardworthy
PMD: Yardworthy
Short Name: SR:Yardworthy
Notes: "Stone row in Yardworthy Newtake, an area of rough pasture that has since undergone some stone clearance. Apparently the remains of a double row it starts 3.0 metres from a low barrow at SX67608438 and extends to the north-east for 7.0 metres. The north-west side consists of four stones, 2.0 to 2.5 metres apart. The south-eastern side about 1.4 metres distant has only one stone and two turf humps which may conceal others. Visible stones are barely 0.1 metres high. Immediately beyond the north-east end is a hollow or stone pit about 4.0 by 2.0 metres diameter. This, and clearance in the area may have destroyed any continuation."
Nearby sites: SX67608439

Page last updated 12/07/15